There is a New Faith in Our Future

Begin speaks to Herut, Hatzohar, and Betar about the history and the future of their Movement. He starts by thanking the members for their strong commitment throughout the years. He reflects on Etzel’s dedication to fighting for the Jewish homeland and Etzel’s patience which prevented a civil war. He shifts and acknowledges the challenges and discrimination the Movement’s members have faced while being in the Opposition. Begin mentions that since the Movement has been in office, it has strengthened the morale of the people. He acknowledges that some members of the Movement are disappointed that they are not part of the new Government. Begin reminds them that the Movement’s guiding principles are justice and righteousness. Additionally, being part of the Movement means to serve the people instead of ourselves. He concludes by sharing his hopes for the upcoming year.

Begin Issues Call to World Jewry

In Begin’s Rosh Hashanah message, he focuses on four topics. He first talks about wanting aliyah to increase from both Jews living in democracies and living under communism. He specifically encourages youth to come and build up the land. Then he talks about the part of the country affected by poverty. Begin asks for Diaspora Jews to help fellow brethren who live in insufferable housing conditions. He reminds his readers that liberty and social justice are Jewish values. He shifts to talk about the importance of Hebrew being the second spoken language by Diaspora Jews. Having Hebrew as a second language will prevent the youth from being completed assimilated and leaving behind their Jewish heritage. Lastly, he talks about Jews unifying to support Israel’s security. He closes by praying that this year will bring peace to all people and Israel.

The Great Change in U.S. Jewry

Begin shares the address he made to the National Press Club during his visit to the United States. He first discusses World War II and how no nation attempted to save European Jews. This leads him to justify why Israel takes seriously every threat made towards Israel. A recent threat Begin mentions was when Israel wasn’t on a map the London Times published. Begin explains that currently Israel’s neighbors will find any excuse to attack, just like what happened in the Yom Kippur War. Begin shifts to explain five actions that could lead to real peace. To explain his distrust towards “international guarantees,” he speaks of what happened in Vietnam after an international guarantee was made. Begin speaks about American Jewry, specifically the youth. Lastly, Begin shares his observation that there is a great change amongst American Jews: In addition to financially supporting Israel, they now feel it’s their duty to take political action.

Menachem Begin Speaks to the American People

Begin is interviewed on “Meet the Press” during his visit to the United States. The interview first focuses on Israel’s relationship with its Arab neighbors and Begin’s stance against concessions prior to peace treaties. Then Begin speaks about why Israel should not be deemed responsible for the breakdown of the Israeli-Egyptian talks. There are questions about Arab refugees, with Yasser Arafat as an example of a refugee from Jerusalem. Begin makes clear that one cannot compare the PLO to Etzel. The interview goes back to discussing Henry Kissinger’s efforts to bring peace in the Middle East. Additionally, Begin expresses concern in U.S. discontinuing its assistance to Israel. Begin also argues that Israel is not isolated by the world. The interview concludes with Begin saying, “…if the Arabs know that Israel is indestructible, they will think about peace. If they know that their artillery can obliterate us, then the chance of peace is lost.”

Time to Settle Accounts with the Russians

Begin exploits the actions of the Russian Government to prevent Soviet Jewry from immigrating to Israel. First, he explains the motives behind the Russian tax placed on those who want to leave to Israel. Additionally, Begin speaks about the absurdity of the education tax that Jews have already paid off. Then Begin focuses on the concentration camps and conditions of labor Russian Jews were forced to partake in. Again, Begin shifts to confront the State loan each worker was required to give, and how only Jews wanting to immigrate to Israel do not receive their share of that loan, nor their pensions. Then Begin speaks about what Jewish youth in the Diaspora should do to support their brethren in Russia. He concludes that the Soviet Jews are true revolutionaries and heroes.