My Plan for Peace

In our peace proposal we suggested that a second, narrow United Nations zone be created in the northern Sinai around the district of Yamit—a new town founded several years ago in the desert by the sea-shore.  May I point out that the two proposed UN zones—conceived as vital to our national security—make up hardly move … Continued

My Plan for Peace

Begin discusses Israel’s plan for peace and the different obstacle Begin has faced in the process. The first part of the peace plan focuses on Palestinian self-rule in Judea, Samaria and the Gaza Strip. Begin then talks about Israel’s peace plan with Egypt, specifically regarding the Sinai Peninsula. In order to give up this land, it must be demilitarized so wars do not reoccur. However, while Anwar Sadat and Begin agreed that the Egyptian army will remain about 200 kilometers from the international boundary, the Egyptian War Minister presented their army being only 40 kilometers from the boundary. This brings Begin to talk about Israeli settlements and how they strengthen Israel’s national security. Then Begin questions the U.S.’s change in opinion about Israel’s peace proposal. He mentions the strong relationship he has with Sadat and then hints of anti-Semitism were published. He closes with still having hopes for peace.

PM Begin at a Briefing at Blair House, Washington

Begin discussed the obstacles in the peace process, as well as the autonomy proposal, at a press conference at Blair House, Washington. He then spoke about the security situation in Judea and Samaria and the Gaza Strip, citing the Coastal Road massacre two weeks prior to the briefing and the Yom Kippur War as examples. He later addressed the Operation Litani’s casualties in Lebanon, the implementation of Resolution 242, and his resignation from the cabinet in 1970.

Israel Will Not Submit to Threats

Begin talks about a series of events regarding the peace process with Egypt. First Begin shares that Begin made it clear that Israel absolutely rejected what Sadat stated he demanded from Israel. Begin continues to say that Israel believes in free negotiations without any prior conditions. He mentions that when Sadat came to Jerusalem and spoke to the Knesset, it was a historic event. Begin shifts to talk about Israel’s peace plan, which Jimmy Carter and his advisors deemed fair. Begin then shares his positive reflections on his visit to Ismailia, including the fact that they “parted in warm friendship.” Begin and Sadat agreed to have two committees, one to negotiate military and the other for political matters. After leaving Ismailia on a seemingly positive note, the controlled Egyptian press wrote anti-Semitic slurs. He concludes by saying Israel and its Arab neighbors should be seen as equals because that is in the direction of peace.

Looking Back on 30 Years of Struggle and Change

A reprinting of a chapter from Begin’s book, THE REVOLT, which appeared in the New York Post as part of a series of reprints. This chapter was appended to cover new information revealed over the decades. His description of his experiences as a prisoner of the Soviets, widely denounced by Communists as propaganda, has been acknowledged as truth. Soviet Jews have renounced Communism for Zionism in large numbers. Begin had accused the British of not wanting the Jews of Europe to be saved in the 1949s, and recently revealed documents show how the British prevented the Red Cross from saving 40,000 Jews from Hungary because they might have gone to Palestine. And after Begin always maintained that Israel’s rightful borders included all of Biblical Israel and that any other borders were artificial, in 1967 Israel finally regained Judea and Samaria, erasing the artificial line.