Irgoult

On “Gaurmont”, a history of the Irgun. It covered its formation, the King David Hotel and Acre Prison operations, and its ultimate dissolution.

Chiefs of the Pre-State Resistance Looks Back

Begin participates in a discussion led by Geulah Cohen with other key actors (Moshe Sneh, Nathan Yellin-Mor, Haim Landau, Shimon Peres, Eliezer Livneh, Shmuel Katz, and Ya’acov Riftin) about the pre-State resistance. Begin first speaks about the United Resistance Movement and argues against Moshe Sneh’s statement that the Haganah always fought against the British regime. He acknowledges that illegal immigration led by the Haganah was an important form of resistance, but not armed resistance. In fact, the Haganah assisted the British regime in the attempt to liquidate the Underground during “the season”. Begin returns to speak about the United Resistance Movement, and about the King David Hotel operation. Begin also shares how the British government was not interested in stopping the annihilation of European Jews during the Holocaust. The discussion closes with disagreement about what happened with Altalena and the mistrust Haganah leaders had towards the Underground’s intentions.

We Must Act to Avert it in Time

Begin writes about Ben Gurion’s continuous attacks on Prime Minister Levi Eshkol. Ben Gurion claimed that “Mr. Eshkol cannot conduct the affairs of the State and its security.” Some are frustrated with Ben Gurion’s behavior and believe that the new Government should not be attacked and criticized. Begin, however, believes that the Opposition not only has a right, it also has a democratic duty to oppose the Government’s decisions. Then Begin mentions that the Knesset can formulate a new Government if they do not have confidence in the current Government. In order for the Knesset to do this, there needs to be cooperation between the Opposition groups, meaning Gahal and Rafi. Begin, however, mentions that he does not think that Rafi members are genuine in their public affirmations that Rafi and Gahal could cooperate. Furthermore, Begin strongly states that Gahal does not want to cooperate with any party who thinks that Gahal is evil and sins.

Let Me Dispel the Fears From Your Hearts

Begin wants to dissolve the discomfort Ha’aretz readers have about Etzel. He begins by emphasizing that it is most important that the readers contemplate his words. Then he continues to mention that no nation besides Israel has ever questioned its liberators’ actions. Instead, it “is considered a privilege by them.” Begin then goes into detail about the hatred he and Etzel felt from the Jewish Agency’s leader, Ben Gurion, prior to the negotiation. He said that Ben Gurion used a system of propaganda, which he referred to as “the hate system.” Along with propaganda, Begin dismantles the lie stating that Etzel did not want a united army after the emergence of the State. Lastly, he mentions the importance of Ben Gurion saying that taking down Altalena might have been a mistake. Through providing a thorough understanding of events that happened in the past, Begin ends his piece with: “it is not we [Etzel] who must correct any image, but they who must correct their angle of vision.”

Churchill’s Help in the Modern Jewish Fight for Freedom

Begin focuses on how Winston Churchill’s beliefs and actions towards both the idea of a Jewish State and Etzel contributed to the revival of the Jewish Homeland. Begin first quotes Churchill’s pledge in 1919 about his hope for a Jewish State. Then Begin discusses Churchill’s influence of the Balfour Declaration, Peel Commission, and White Papers. All of these documents explain the shift of England’s position of a future national home for the Jewish nation throughout the years. Begin then shares Churchill’s desire for the destruction of Etzel, and as a result the Haganah began the “season.” Begin explains that because of Churchill’s position, it strengthened the argument that Jews alone liberated their land. Begin mentions Churchill’s strength against Nazi Germany and concludes by quoting the Irgun’s response to Churchill’s want for the total destruction of Etzel.