A Victory for Humanity

Begin writes a message to celebrate Israel’s 30th anniversary of independence. He first mentions the hardships Jews faced during their nearly 2,000 years of exile. He specifically references to the Holocaust and the sacrifices Jews made for Israel’s existence. Then he speaks about Israel’s history—the wars, the cultivation of land, the ingathering of Jewish exiles, and the unification of Jerusalem. He talks about how Israel still has not experienced a day of peace, and that the peace efforts with neighboring countries will continue. Begin then shifts and mentions the Jews from Europe and Soviet Union who returned to Judaism. Furthermore, he believes that the continuity of the campaign for their right to return to the Jewish homeland. Begin then gives thanks to Israel’s fallen heroes. He lastly states that people from every nation shall rejoice for “Israel’s rebirth is, indeed, a victory of humanity.”

My Plan for Peace

Begin discusses Israel’s plan for peace and the different obstacle Begin has faced in the process. The first part of the peace plan focuses on Palestinian self-rule in Judea, Samaria and the Gaza Strip. Begin then talks about Israel’s peace plan with Egypt, specifically regarding the Sinai Peninsula. In order to give up this land, it must be demilitarized so wars do not reoccur. However, while Anwar Sadat and Begin agreed that the Egyptian army will remain about 200 kilometers from the international boundary, the Egyptian War Minister presented their army being only 40 kilometers from the boundary. This brings Begin to talk about Israeli settlements and how they strengthen Israel’s national security. Then Begin questions the U.S.’s change in opinion about Israel’s peace proposal. He mentions the strong relationship he has with Sadat and then hints of anti-Semitism were published. He closes with still having hopes for peace.

Israel Will Not Submit to Threats

Begin talks about a series of events regarding the peace process with Egypt. First Begin shares that Begin made it clear that Israel absolutely rejected what Sadat stated he demanded from Israel. Begin continues to say that Israel believes in free negotiations without any prior conditions. He mentions that when Sadat came to Jerusalem and spoke to the Knesset, it was a historic event. Begin shifts to talk about Israel’s peace plan, which Jimmy Carter and his advisors deemed fair. Begin then shares his positive reflections on his visit to Ismailia, including the fact that they “parted in warm friendship.” Begin and Sadat agreed to have two committees, one to negotiate military and the other for political matters. After leaving Ismailia on a seemingly positive note, the controlled Egyptian press wrote anti-Semitic slurs. He concludes by saying Israel and its Arab neighbors should be seen as equals because that is in the direction of peace.

PM Begin in an Interview with Luxemburg Radio (Paris) in Jerusalem

Begin addressed to the recently renewed negotiations with Egypt, amid anti-Semitic remarks expressed in the Egyptian press, in an interview with Luxemburg radio. He then went on to discuss the countries’ differing viewpoints on Israeli settlements in the Sinai Peninsula and the region’s demilitarization. Later, Begin discussed a variety of topics, including the autonomy proposal, the role of the United States in the negotiations, and his friendship with Sadat in the wake of Sadat’s hostile interview with October magazine. He then went on to discuss the Israel-France relationship, expressing a wish to see France’s hostile policy toward Israel end and the Franco-Israeli alliance renewed. Finally, Begin spoke about his election to the position of Prime Minister.

Our Plan for Peace

Begin focuses on actions of Israel’s Arab neighbors to show that they do not want lasting peace with Israel. He starts by expressing that both United States and Israel want to increase the momentum towards the peace-making process. Then he shifts to a problem. He talks about how the PLO’s charter includes Hiterlized philosophy. He quotes an article from the Palestinian National Convention. Begin understands that it says that Arabs can return to Palestine and there is not room for Jews. Additionally, the PLO denies the biblical relationship Jews have to the land. He talks about PLO’s terrorism and ultimately says that although Israel does and won’t give up on peace, it cannot have productive talks with an organization whose philosophy is “based on an Arabic ‘Mein Kampf.'” Begin shifts to talk about Israel’s participation in the Geneva Peace Conference. He concludes with mentioning what Israel will do if the PLO is allowed to participate in the Geneva Conference.